When you reach the point of not being able to read up close without stretching your arms to the limit, you may need to consider single-vision reading glasses.

Reading glasses come in two main styles:

Full frames, in which the entire lens is made in the reading prescription

“Half-eyes,” which are the smaller “Ben Franklin” style glasses that sit lower down on your nose

Full reading glasses are suitable for people who spend a great deal of time concentrating on material close-up. These give you a larger field of view for reading, but if you try to look up and across the room through them, everything appears blurry.

In contrast, “half-eye” reading glasses allow you to look down and through the lenses for near work, and up and over them to see in the distance.

Generally, people who have never needed glasses in the past will start out with a pair of reading glasses rather than progressive lenses or bifocals, which are usually a better choice if you have a need for distance as well as near correction.

Reading Glasses Are Not Computer Glasses

Don’t confuse reading glasses with computer glasses. If you’re using reading glasses to try to view your computer screen, it’s probably not working very well. For one thing, reading printed matter is done at a closer range than reading text on a computer screen.

Also, if your reading glasses are the type that force you to lean your head back in order to view your monitor, you’re placing unnecessary strain on your neck muscles. Computer users really should invest in prescription computer glasses for the greatest comfort and protection from high-energy visible blue light when viewing computer screens and other digital devices.

The Danger of Forgoing an Eye Exam

The other, more serious problem with using pre-fabricated reading glasses has less to do with the glasses than with one of the reasons that people purchase them. Some people head to their pharmacy, or local supermarket instead of the optometrist when they notice that it’s time for a stronger correction. In fact, a recent survey of presbyopes revealed that 17 percent purchased readers because they “didn’t want to bother with an eye exam.

Common sense and good eye health dictate that you should consult your optometrist when you need a change in prescription, or at least once every two years. The need for a new pair of reading glasses may be nothing more than the natural aging process at work. But it might also signal a serious problem with your eyes that can be treated if caught in time.

Very important: Always make sure you discuss and make decisions about your eye care based upon a formal appointment with your optician.

For more information and to book and eye examination please contact us:

McKenna & Scott Pinelands

Tel: 021 531 1953

pinelands@mckennascott.com